SEASONAL INJURIES

  • STRAINS
  • SPRAINS
  • FALLS
  • JOINT AND MUSCLE PAIN
SUMMER

GOLF INJURIES

The golf swing produces large loads in the spine, particularly during downswing to follow-through. These loads approach that of professional football linemen hitting a sled. Be careful.  If your discomfort lingers; a PT can help.

SUMMER

RUNNING INJURY

Start slow. If you’re just starting a new running regimen, start slow with low intensity and shorter distances. If you ever find yourself in pain that just won’t go away, consider having a physical therapist look at the problem area and give you some tips for reducing pain!

SUMMER

WARM UP

Sprain and strain injuries can be prevented by performing proper warm-ups and cool-downs before and after every session of play or exercise. The more warm and flexible your ligaments, tendons, and muscles are, the less likely they are to tear or to overstretch.

SPRING: SEASONAL INJURIES

  • STRAINS
  • SPRAINS
  • FALLS
  • JOINT AND MUSCLE PAIN
SPRING

GARDENING INJURIES

Common gardening such as digging, planting, weeding or raking can strain muscles and joints.  Give your back and knees a break and change positions frequently.  If your discomfort lingers; a PT can help.

SPRING

SPRING CLEANING

Spring cleaning is a great way to recharge and get your house back in order, however organizing closets and cleaning out the basement can create achy, stiff joints, and tight muscles. If you ever find yourself in pain that just won’t go away, consider having a physical therapist look at the problem area and give you some tips for reducing pain!

SPRING

COMMON RUNNING INJURIES

It’s important to warm up before starting a workout.  If you have not been running over the winter months leading up to spring, start slowly.  Listen to your body when it’s telling you to slow down or stop for a rest.

WINTER: SEASONAL INJURIES

  • 58,500 injuries from ice skating
  • 91,000 injuries from sledding and tobogganing
  • 144,000 injuries from snow skiing
  • 148,000 injuries from snowboarding
WINTER

SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING

Of the nearly 144,000 skiing injuries reported per year, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are the most common. Tears or ruptures of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) or Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) of the knee are some of the most debilitating injuries and often require surgery.

WINTER

SLIPS & FALLS

One out of 5 falls causes a serious injury and you must be careful when walking on wet or icy surfaces. Other risks associated with falls are muscle weakness and problems with balance and gait.  A physical therapist can help you avoid these injuries.

WINTER

SKATING

When skiing or skating, it is very easy to break your wrist or fingers. The straps of the ski pole could lead to an injury to your wrist or a tear to the ligaments of your thumb. Skier’s thumb is a common injury that occurs when skiers fall awkwardly on their hands while holding a ski pole.